Donburi Boy

Sep 20 2014
They might look funny but these homemade dumplings taste awesome!

They might look funny but these homemade dumplings taste awesome!

1 note

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On the Loot That Is Character

rdansky:

So here’s the great thing about the Telltale story-driven games.

It’s not that they’re “GREAT STORIES”, though they are in fact excellent examples of the storyteller’s art, showing keen understanding of their respective properties (Walking Dead and Fables, respectively, for those of you yahoos who haven’t played them yet, and if you haven’t, what are you waiting for). There have been, much to the surprise of many, quite a few excellent stories in games over the years. No, that’s not what makes these two, Walking Dead and Wolf Among Us, stand out.

It’s because Telltale figured out a mechanic - a mechanic! Yes! A game mechanic as a storytelling tool in a game! - to make you care about the characters in the game world.

And how do they do that? By stripping away all of the “game” elements of the game until those character are all that’s left. You don’t level in The Wolf Among Us. You don’t collect loot. You don’t get XP or better armor or a +3 sword of fable-smiting. In fact, they have taken absolutely everything that you normally use to keep track of your progress and advancement in a game and stripped it out.

The only thing that’s left? Character. More specifically, your relationships with the other characters in the world. There is, quite literally, nothing else to hold on to. 

And that is, by and large, the mechanical function of those characters in the design as well. They’re not quest givers. They’re not there to give you combos or unlock skill trees or shoot bad guys or do anything mechanical for you. They are there to be a part of the world, the only part of the world that matters from moment to moment. 

It’s a remarkable achievement, and an elegant one. To make characters mean more, give the player less. Bravo.

10 notes

Sep 19 2014
Sep 18 2014
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She is a Templar. He is an Assassin.

She is a Templar. He is an Assassin.

(Source: chicagosouthclub, via assassinscreed)

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comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.
Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.

READ MORE

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mma-gifs:

Finger Taekwondo Performance in Korea

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(Source: culturetrash)

4 notes

Sep 17 2014
The bastard form of mass culture is humiliated repetition… always new books, new programs, new films, news items, but always the same meaning
— Roland Barthes  (via 1109-83)

(Source: nyctaeus, via culturetrash)

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assassinscreed:

In Assassin’s Creed Unity you can play as a melee expert, agile infiltrator, or a silent master of stealth and join forces with up to three friends to take on a variety of co-op missions. Whether you’re tackling heists or assassinations, you’ll need planning, teamwork, and a combination of your whole team’s complementary skills to succeed, but if you do you’ll be handsomely rewarded.

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minim-calibre:

I miss this show.

I miss Phil and Lem, especially. And not just because you could give them the portmanteau Phlem. 

(Source: jojondro, via imaginary-cigarettes)

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magictransistor:

Ayasofya, ايا صوفيا., Αγίας Σοφίας, Sancta Sophia, Sancta Sapientia or Hagia Sophia (Istanbul).

magictransistor:

Ayasofya, ايا صوفيا., Αγίας Σοφίας, Sancta Sophia, Sancta Sapientia or Hagia Sophia (Istanbul).

115 notes

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(Kutiman - Thru You Too - Give it Up)

(Retweeted this earlier in the week from Far Cry 4 creative director Alex Hutchinson, but it’s been stuck in my head since then, so now it can be stuck in your head too!)

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